Thursday, October 19, 2017

What’s in a name? Gilchrist rebrands itself

Over the last 23 years, Gilchrist Hospice Care has done so much to help so many people at the end of life, and their families. A few years ago, we changed the name to Gilchrist Services to show the community that Gilchrist was more than excellent end of life care. Annually, Gilchrist provides elder medical care to 7,500 individuals, hospice care to 5,400 patients and grief counseling and bereavement services to 6,500 family members. The organization also counsels individuals on care planning, guiding them through decisions about their treatment and helping them make informed choices for their advanced chronic disease. We were still concerned that “Gilchrist Services” was not working as a name.

Earlier this week, Gilchrist launched a new branding and advertising campaign that aims to educate the public that Gilchrist is “more than hospice.” I've asked Cathy Hamel, President of Gilchrist and our system’s Vice President for Continuing Care, to talk about it in this week’s blog.

What triggered the new brand and advertising campaign? Why now?
The mission of the “new” Gilchrist is to provide quality compassionate care, counseling and support to people at every stage of serious illness, so that they may live life to the fullest.  Although a lofty goal, at no time in history is this work needed more than now.  As medicine continues to advance, people are living longer.  And as the population ages, more and more people are struggling to cope with a serious illness or caring for an aging parent.  We want people to know that today’s Gilchrist is here to meet their needs, whether guiding them through treatment options, providing medical care in their home or residential care community or helping them to navigate the often complex, health care system.

What’s the primary goal of the campaign?
We hope that this campaign will allow us to better communicate the broad range of services that Gilchrist offers for people with serious illness.  Our new campaign aims to educate people that “even before hospice, there’s Gilchrist.”  From elder medical care to grief counseling to volunteer assistance and more, Gilchrist will provide clear information and loving care at every stage of serious illness, so people can live life to the fullest, on their own terms.

Are you hoping that through this campaign you can address some of the public misconceptions or stigma surrounding hospice and end-of-life care?
Gilchrist will always be known for the compassionate end-of-life care and services that we provide.  And believe it or not, although most Americans are still afraid of dying, the use of hospice has grown exponentially in the past 20 years.  But that is really not what this campaign is about.  It’s about communicating the point that today’s Gilchrist extends services to individuals with serious illness who need our care and support well in advance of hospice care.

Can you describe the programs that Gilchrist offers? What new services are you thinking about?
We have reorganized our programs into three main service lines: Counseling and Support, Elder Medical Care and Hospice Care.  By clearly defining our services under this continuum of care, we believe that we can more effectively communicate the breadth of services we offer to those with serious illness—through every stage—so that they may live life to the fullest.  Our physicians, nurse practitioners, and social workers provide medical care for people who can no longer safely access their care in medical offices by going to their homes. We provide palliative consultations in nursing homes and assisted living facilities in addition to acute care hospitals.  We provide the care in the GBMC rehabilitation unit, (previously known as Unit 54), and we, of course, continue to provide nationally recognized hospice care for children and adults.  We are also the only hospice in Central Maryland who offer Medicare patients on-going treatment for their disease and hospice care concurrently for select diagnosis.

In summary, we are deeply committed to giving people the clear information and loving support they need to make informed choices about their care.

I would like to invite you to visit our new website, www.gilchristcares.org to learn more about the new Gilchrist.

***
I sincerely thank Cathy and the entire Gilchrist team for all that they do every day for elders and patients at the end of life. I applaud them for their person-centeredness and their excellence!

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

How Reliable is Our Care?

As I write this blog, we are a couple of hours into our triennial unannounced Joint Commission survey at GBMC. Think of it as a checkup. The surveyors are going to check to see how reliable our care is.

I was thinking back to 2011, when I first touched on the concept of reliability in this blog:  http://ahealthydialogue.blogspot.com/2011/03/best-way-should-be-only-way.html. To reduce the concept to its simplest definition, reliability means “what should happen happens and what should not happen….doesn’t.” To get to very high reliability, or error rates close to zero, an organization must find the potential causes of failure, the so-called “holes in the Swiss Cheese”, before they can line up to cause a miss, that might lead to patient or staff harm. Being vigilant about filling in those “holes” is also called preoccupation with failure. Are we zealously looking for problems and fixing them when we find them?  When we see people drifting from our designs for safety are we calling it out or are we looking the other way? We know we are not perfect but it’s good to have outside eyes looking at our processes and to see just how reliable we have become and where we can still improve.

During LDM this morning, I learned of a phenomenal success that took place in Family Care Associates, one of our patient-centered medical homes, on Tuesday. They received 271 phone calls and answered every one within their 20-second standard! This is an incredible accomplishment after having implemented the phone call redesign that was created during the recent Kaizen led by our Lean facilitator, Farrukh Kidwai. What should happen…the phone gets answered efficiently…happened without a failure! An example of a 100% reliable process! Congratulations to Family Care Associates for achieving the President’s Four Aim Recognition. Family Care is now the third advanced primary care practice, along with Owings Mills and Hunt Manor to have implemented the new standard design for telephone calls.

National Physician Assistant Week
Please join me in celebrating all GBMC physician assistants (PAs). This week is National PA Week (Oct. 6-12) and is a time when PAs celebrate their profession and showcase the value they bring to today’s healthcare team.

The physician assistants at GBMC practice in many areas from the outpatient offices to the inpatient units in a wide variety of specialties. A PA is a nationally certified and state-licensed medical professional who begin their careers with rigorous education in a highly competitive field.  Upon completion of a bachelor’s degree, prospective students must then attend an intense three-year program and complete at least 2,000 hours of supervised clinical practice.  They then must pass the Physician Assistant National Certifying Exam (PANCE), which is administered by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA).

Please join me in thanking our PA’s for their hard work and for their important role in caring for our patients.

2017 Healthcare Security and Safety Week
I want to thank all the members of our GBMC security staff as this week is Healthcare Safety and Security Week (Oct. 9-15).

The GBMC security team can be seen walking or stationed throughout our medical center from the emergency department to labor and delivery. Our security and safety officers meet the challenge every day to keep all of us safe at GBMC. They are vital members of the healthcare team and we cannot be successful without them.

Please join me in thanking our security staff for their hard work and for their strong commitment and the diligence they display in the practice of their profession.

Help Support The Joseph Richey House
Later this month employees, volunteers, and patients will be participating in the Baltimore Running Festival and fundraising for GBMC HealthCare's Gilchrist Center Baltimore – Joseph Richey House.

Gilchrist Hospice has helped so many individuals and families through the end of life.  The Gilchrist team not only delivers world-class medical care to patients in their final days, but they also provide the emotional and spiritual support needed through the bereavement process. One of the founding principles of the Joseph Richey House is to provide services to everyone, regardless of their ability to pay. Joseph Richey is a 19-bed residential hospice designed to care for terminally-ill patients and serves 150 of these individuals each year, 80 percent of which are Baltimore City residents. The GBMC system and our community are very lucky to have Gilchrist to help individuals complete their lives with dignity and on their terms.

I want to thank all of our employees, volunteers, patients and supporters of GBMC Healthcare who are running during the Festival and helping to raise awareness of the great work at Joseph Richey.

Unfortunately, registration for running to support the Joseph Richey House is closed, BUT, you can help still support RunGBMC in other ways. Please consider being a volunteer the day of the race, by contacting Morgan Cook at MCOOK@gbmc.org or click here to join us in raising money for The Joseph Richey House and giving back to our community. Thank you!

Friday, October 6, 2017

Proud of a Wonderful Accomplishment

Last week, I went to Verona, Wisconsin, for the annual Epic Users Group Meeting. Healthcare companies that have installed Epic from all over the country gather to hear what is new and to share information about how to use the software to improve care.


I took a bus, with others, from the hotel to the Epic campus and walked into the building outside the large theater where the opening address from the CEO of Epic, Judy Faulkner, was about to begin. I was delighted that the first thing I saw upon entering the building was a banner announcing our achievement of HIMMS Analytics Stage 7. I can’t tell you how proud I was to see that banner. Being the first healthcare company in the state to achieve Stage 7, the highest stage, on the HIMSS Analytics Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model (EMRAM) for both our hospital care and ambulatory services shouldn’t be taken lightly. HIMSS Analytics developed the EMR Adoption Model as a tool to benchmark information technology maturity in healthcare organizations. Less than five percent of hospitals in the United States have achieved Stage 7 certification.

The award is recognition for operating in a paperless environment and representing best practices in implementing electronic health records. Make no mistake this accomplishment is due to the commitment and the hard work of the GBMC staff which includes our highly-skilled team of physicians, nurses, other clinicians and IT professionals. Our achievement was not without its challenges but the resiliency of our people in working through glitches has been impressive. Within our hospital, our physician company, and Gilchrist we have now achieved ‘one patient, one record’ and we continue to work with our private practicing physicians, nursing homes and other providers to connect with them through the Chesapeake Regional Information Sharing for Our Patients (CRISP) network. Without this, we cannot achieve our vision of being the community-based health system where every patient gets the care that we would want for our own loved ones.

Earlier this week, here at home, we celebrated our one-year anniversary of being live with Epic during EPIC 2017: CELEBRATE THE EPIC ADVENTURE. This star-studded, fun-filled event gave us a peek into the future of our clinical and administrative information system. As part of our continuous improvement efforts to ensure we have the most current technology infrastructure, next week we will upgrade to Epic 2017. This upgrade will include enhancements to the overall look and feel of Epic, have simpler and more consistent icons, and improved wayfinding for navigating the system. New functionality will also be available to optimize workflows and assist with improving end-user efficiency. There are many projects underway which will further leverage Epic’s functionality such as electronic prescribing of controlled substances and electronic pre authorizations. MyChart continues to grow with added features and functionality. Later this month, we will begin releasing ambulatory history and physical notes to MyChart and eventually progress notes. These initiatives will continue the push for empowering our patients with their information and encourage participation with their care.

Two years later…
You know, it’s been two years since our 50th Anniversary Gala. I can’t believe how time has flown by. Our 50th Anniversary celebrations were a wonderful recognition of GBMC’s rich history and its bright future. The community’s philanthropic support during the anniversary year was phenomenal and has aided our ability to continue with our transformation by supporting our patient-centered medical homes and tools like Epic.

October is National Cyber Security Awareness month 
The sharing of electronic information in all aspects of care delivery is important but is not without its risks. Through the Internet, health systems and other industries are under attack from criminals who look to profit from stealing information that should be private. You’ve probably all seen the headlines regarding the Equifax breach which impacted over 100 million people. It has been proven that the highest vulnerability for data breaches is not with the software itself but is through us, the users. Criminals know this and set out to trick us into opening our systems to them so that they can do their dirty work. We must all be vigilant and own the security of our information systems. Please bring the same questioning attitude that you use when delivering patient care to your use of e-mail, the electronic record, and other applications. Don’t click links unless you are sure it’s safe, don’t go to websites you aren’t familiar with and ask IT for guidance if something doesn’t quite “seem right”. Together, using simple internet safety precautions, we can help keep GBMC safer from cybercrime. I want to thank Dave Hynson, GBMC’s Chief Information Officer, and his team for all their hard work in addressing the issues and keeping us on normal operations. Also, don’t forget to look for our IT Security team’s educational materials and tips throughout the month and throughout the year.

Monday, October 2, 2017

Another Wonderful Celebration in the Sun

The 17th running of Legacy Chase at Shawan Downs was a huge success. Mother Nature was kind enough to provide us with nice weather, allowing us to enjoy the beautiful horses, a picturesque countryside setting and fun with family and friends – there were approximately 8,000 attendees this year – coming together for a fabulous time.

Stretched across 300 acres of green meadows at Shawan Downs in northern Baltimore County, Legacy Chase attracts visitors of all ages for a day of steeplechase races, railside tailgating, live music, great food and family-friendly activities. Many of the crowd-pleasing traditions continued this year—such as the G. Leslie Grimes Memorial Stick Pony Race for kids— and GBMC added some exciting new components to help make this year’s event a success. Brand new this year, was the Survivor Shuffle, a unique and exciting dance aimed to draw attention to the fight against cancer. I want to thank the more than 150 volunteers who took part in this fun and new effort which ultimately was a great way to show support for our Oncology services. Hats, Horses, and Hope was the theme to celebrate cancer survivors. Each of the symbols create a sense of comfort and strength for cancer patients. Children also came dressed as their favorite superhero or received a free cape on-site to show their support for the fight, while some guests boasted their best hat to show support for oncology patients, as funds raised benefit oncology support services at the Sandra & Malcolm Berman Cancer Institute at GBMC. In the 2017 calendar year, at the end of Legacy Chase we raised $1.25 million for Oncology Services from 435 community supporters, including fundraising and sales from Legacy Chase.

Legacy Chase also gives us an opportunity to engage with the community, employees, donors and local businesses in the work of our healthcare system. We are proud to receive tremendous support from the community-at-large and our family here at home. 

Despite no incentive of a world record to break like last year – a record which we still hold by the way – we continue to receive great community and employee support. There were 35 GBMC departments that participated in activities throughout the summer to engage the community, promote the event and encourage fundraising. And they had some fun too! Special recognition goes to the GBMC Epic team, which raised almost $3,000 through a car wash and other activities.

The Sandra and Malcolm Berman Cancer Institute is able to provide patients with the best treatment and care possible thanks to continued annual support. The Institute is the only comprehensive community cancer program certified with distinction by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer in the Baltimore region. GBMC has invested in talent and technology to provide the best for oncology patients. Whether they are in need of outpatient, inpatient, home care, hospice or survivorship services, the more than 2,000 new cancer patients annually at GBMC get the best care.

This wonderful event (highlighted in the below video) would not have been successful without the support of our loyal volunteers, who helped us make this year’s event very special. I thank all those who attended and all those who donated time or treasure. Special thanks to the GBMC Philanthropy and Marketing Departments, who worked so hard in putting the event together. There’s still time to support the cause by visiting www.legacychase.org

Friday, September 22, 2017

MyChart Bedside and the Era of Consumerism in Healthcare – We Need Your Feedback

We live in the age of technology and an era of consumerism in healthcare where everyone is connected and bombarded with enormous amounts of information on a daily basis. But how do we use technology to keep people interested and engaged? At GBMC, we’re always looking for ways to improve patient care and better meet the needs of our patients.

Toward that end, in our hospital we have begun testing a new tool that is part of the EPIC system called MyChart Bedside. Some of you may be familiar with MyChart at GBMC, a way to connect to your personal patient records through an app or online. The MyChart Bedside tool is an extension of this technology that two units – U25/26 postpartum and U48 surgical – are testing with inpatients. Patients on these units are being presented with an iPad that has the tool loaded. Nurses are encouraging patients to explore the app, login to their existing MyChart account or create a new account. Through the iPad, patients can participate in their care by accessing education and information, what to expect when they’re discharged, find test results, and even watch movies.

So, what we really want to know from patients who have used the MyChart Bedside tool at GBMC is:

How did you like it?

Did you use it?

Did you dislike it? If so, why? And…

What should we add to MyChart Bedside that would really add value for you?

On the Postpartum unit, Jodie Bell, BSN, RNC, IBCLC, Clinical Director, Postpartum and Newborn Nursery, explains that more than 90 percent of patients are presented with the MyChart Bedside iPad upon admission. They have started documenting this program on their LDM board to hone in on how patients are using the MyChart Bedside tool during their stay. What they have found is that patients on this unit are using the program for:

  1. Obtaining health metrics such as vital signs and lab results.
  2. Looking up information about the medication they are taking and when doses are due.
  3. Accessing education topics such as recovery, care at home, and caring for the baby.
  4. Creating a MyChart account. Jodie says that they rarely see patients leave the hospital without having an existing MyChart account or creating a new one. 

Jodie adds, “MyChart Bedside can also be used for fun. Patients and family members can use the iPads to access movies, for example, which also helps occupy older kids when mom and dad are caring for the new baby. Patients can use social media, browse online or even put in non-urgent requests for things like blankets or ice.

Ashley Dickenson, RN, shows the MyChart Bedside app on an iPad on U25/26.
The nurses are also really good at providing iPads to all of our patients and encouraging them to use the tool. And while we’re seeing that most patients like the technology, some patients find they don’t have time to use the tool while caring for themselves or a new baby, or have not found the technology particularly useful. Overall, however, it’s been well received and we are looking to optimize the iPads based on feedback from patients. This includes adding a breastfeeding app and an app where people can order meals directly from Food Service instead of calling in orders by phone.”

The usefulness of this technology for our surgical patients, however, is still in question. On U48, we are seeing mixed results with MyChart Bedside. Some patients love it. Others don’t use it at all.

Ceil Gayhardt, RN, BSN, Clinical Manager on U48, explains:

“The challenge for us is to get our short stay patients engaged with the tool since they come to us sleepy and often have narcotics or anesthesia still on board, making them less than receptive to engage with MyChart Bedside. The bariatric service is focused on telling their patients about it ahead of time and encouraging them to interact, so that helps.

On the surgical unit, our goals are to give patients a means in which to be more interactive with their care.  It can be a way for patients or their families to access information about their procedure, medications, real time vital signs, or upcoming tests. Patient education is also at their fingertips. Education that was traditionally done one-on-one with the nurse is loaded onto the iPad so patients can view the information when it’s convenient for them. This also allows for multiple presentations of the material since the nurse reviews the information with the patient as well.  This is important since it often takes multiple presentations of material for patients to absorb or retain the information as they are in an altered state of health.”

Dr. Elizabeth Dovec, Medical Director of the GBMC Comprehensive Obesity Management Program, took a quick poll of some of her bariatric surgery patients on U48 to see what they thought of MyChart Bedside. Special bariatric surgery videos are preloaded onto the iPads for these patients to watch post-surgery. Here is some of the feedback she received:


  • “I really enjoyed it. It allowed me to take my time and go through each slide so I didn’t have to feel rushed into obtaining a lot of information all at once the day after my procedure.”
  • “Very informative and it was seen at the right time while recovering in my room. Convenient. You can learn and feel more confident of the process going forward.”
  • “I watched them and I was able to look at my relevant patient information. It was more valuable on the day of discharge. I was out of it the day of surgery.”
  • “I loved the videos. Being tired from surgery and anesthesia, I found the videos to be a positive affirmation and a way to solidify key points, briefly and succinctly. Very useful. Thumbs up!”
  • “I received an iPad but I was so out of it when they told me what it was for that I didn't remember and forgot to use it when I was there.”

***

It’s been an interesting test of a program that is designed to be innovative, interactive, and convenient for patients.  But, how well is this tool working for patients?

This is your opportunity to share your experiences with MyChart Bedside or even if you have not yet used the tool to give your ideas of things you would like to see added if you were to be a patient. How can GBMC better utilize this tool for inpatients? Did you love it, hate it, or even ignore it? I’d love to hear from you on this topic. Leave your comments and experiences below in the comments section.

**

On a final note, this Saturday, September 23rd, is the 17th annual Legacy Chase at Shawan Downs, which benefits GBMC’s oncology services and patient support programs. This is always a wonderful community and family event. Be sure to join us on Saturday – get all of the information here: http://legacychase.org/.

Friday, September 15, 2017

A Conversation With GBMC HealthCare’s Director of Diversity and Inclusion

The GBMC HealthCare System is committed to having a workforce that mirrors our community. In order to achieve our vision, we need to be welcoming to all. We need to celebrate our racial, cultural, and other differences to help us become more unified as a team. GBMC recognizes the need for it to be more deliberate in its actions to achieve inclusivity. Towards this end last year, we hired a new Director of Diversity and Inclusion, Jennifer Marana, MS, PhD. Jennifer has been leading our Diversity and Inclusion Council and I asked her to guest author this blog.

Jennifer has over 15 years of experience in diversity. Her primary responsibilities, in her previous places of employment, have included diversity and intercultural communication training, facilitating focus group discussions and data analysis that help to develop diversity initiatives and strategies. I believe that Jennifer’s skills and experience are just what we need to help us become even more inclusive. Jennifer believes our commitment to providing a Just Culture and developing an inclusive community resonates with her personally and professionally.

Please join me in welcoming Jennifer if you haven’t already!

Can you tell me a little more about your background?
I have worked as a diversity and inclusion professional for more than 15 years, directing strategic diversity initiatives at institutions of higher education such as McDaniel College, Claremont McKenna College, and Bard College. One of my most poignant experiences related to diversity and inclusion has been raising a child with special needs. My 13-year-old son has cerebral palsy among other health-related challenges. While I was already steeped in diversity work before he was born, my experience with him brought a new meaning to my work. My empathy for those who are different from myself has deepened and I have become more fervent about teaching and training to assist others with expanding their understanding and connection across difference as well.

What brought you to GBMC?
I was interested in bringing my knowledge, skill, and experience with diversity and inclusion into a new environment.  When I learned more about GBMC’s needs related to diversity and inclusion, I knew I could make a difference.

As the director of Diversity and Inclusion, what is your role and primary focus?
The diversity and inclusion mission of the GBMC HealthCare System is to create a more diverse workforce and foster an inclusive workplace. This will allow us to better achieve our vision by providing culturally competent care. This mission guides my work as I develop training, multicultural programming, dialogue facilitation, and provide overall leadership and support for GBMC’s strategic diversity goals.

Diversity is a very broad subject. Do you have a simplified definition of diversity?
Diversity is the combination, inclusion, and acceptance of the identities, experiences, and knowledge that make us who we are.

What is the most common mistake in our thinking about diversity?
I believe that some people think too narrowly about diversity.  They see it solely about the numbers – the racial/ethnic demographics.  As a diversity practitioner, I am intentional about coupling the word diversity with inclusion so that we address diversity in terms of race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, and other aspects of our identity while creating spaces for mutual respect, learning, and understanding that comes with bridging the divides that may result from these differences.  

What does the role Director of Diversity mean at GBMC Healthcare and how do you see your role enhancing the GBMC community?
The role of Director of Diversity & Inclusion is a testament to GBMC’s commitment to its diversity and inclusion mission.  In some organizations, diversity and inclusion work is assigned as an additional task for the Learning & Organizational Development Director or other professional.  In these cases, diversity and inclusion work is not given the attention it deserves.  There is great value in having someone spearhead diversity and inclusion efforts.  This requires dedication and work from all employees, it requires a leader to guide the way.

Last month, your department facilitated an “Inclusivity Learning Forum” that you were particularly excited about, can you tell us who showed up to your forum and what the outcome was?
I have actually been excited about every single one of the Inclusivity Learning Forums (ILF) that the Diversity & Inclusion Council has hosted.  The Inclusivity and Learning Forums (ILF) are monthly educational seminars on topics that foster, promote and facilitate dialogue about diversity and inclusion.  Up to this point, we have addressed topics related to our Muslim, Jewish, LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) communities and even hosted a discussion on how to “Teach a Child about Diversity.” They provide a vehicle for learning about the diverse cultures, religions, and experiences that make up the GBMC employee and patient population.

The August Inclusivity Learning Forum was on the topic of “Judaism and GBMC.” panelists shared what it means to them to be Jewish and practice the Sabbath (if they do so), how their faith influences their work, and what we can do to make GBMC a more inclusive place to work.  Their responses illustrated the commonalities they shared in their faith as well as the diversity of their practices. We discussed what resources employees can access on the Sabbath and/or Jewish holidays if serving a Jewish patient who may refuse specific care.  Because many of our Jewish friends and colleagues may not be accessible on these days, Dr. Frankel shared a related story and taught attendees the term “Vechai Bohem,” words from the old testament that basically mean "to live by them."  Therefore, if someone comes to the hospital on the Sabbath or on a Jewish holiday and they refuse specific care, all we need to tell them is..."Vechai Bohem,” conveying that life is of utmost importance.

What is the WISER movement?
WISER is Working In Sync to Enhance Resiliency at GBMC.  Resiliency is the ability of employees to recover and remain engaged even in challenging work environments.  It is the opposite of burnout. The WISER team is made up of a group of GBMC colleagues who care for others while caring for themselves.  The team develops resiliency initiatives to support GBMC employees’ ability to engage patients and others as individuals and derive intrinsic value form work (at work) and disconnect and “recharge” (outside of work).  

What are some other programs or workshops your department has started and how can GBMC Healthcare employees get more information?
In addition to the monthly Inclusivity Learning Forums and WISER program, you will find the “Diversity & Inclusion Corner” of monthly cultural and religious observances and holidays on the Infoweb.  We have expanded the annual Black History Month celebration to include weekly activities throughout the month of February.  For more information, email diversity@gbmc.org

What would you like people to know about the council and future initiatives for employees?
The Diversity & Inclusion Council is committed to creating a framework that reflects our vision of creating an organization that attracts, retains, and leverages the diversity of our staff to meet the needs of our workplace and the populations we serve.  Future initiatives include religious and cultural celebrations, holidays, and upcoming GBMC diversity and inclusion events, a talk Line that employees can call if they feel as though an event, interaction, or encounter has left them feeling uneasy, disrespected or excluded from a diversity and inclusion standpoint.  Professional development opportunities related to developing inclusive work environments and engaging in bold conversations about diversity and inclusion.

Friday, September 8, 2017

Lights! Camera!....

On Thursday morning, you might have seen a video crew following our teams during the daily Lean Daily Management (LDM) walk. They were here filming LDM because of our national patient safety award, from the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management and Datix, that we received last year.

We were honored with the inaugural ASHRM Patient Safety Award for our use of LDM to improve health outcomes for patients and reduce preventable harm such as infections, falls with injury and hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.


Since we started LDM, we have seen a significant reduction in not only patient harm but employee injuries as well. We have also used this technique to reduce waste and improve patient satisfaction. We measure our progress towards achieving our vision by our results in each of our four aims of the Best Health Outcome and the Best Care Experience with the Least Waste of resources and the Most Joy for those providing the care.



In winning the award, we demonstrated how LDM principles, applied in a health care setting, improved patient safety. Some examples of the improvements through LDM included a reduction in catheter associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) of 92 percent, surgical site infections (SSI) by 85 percent along with a reduction in readmissions rates for patients, fewer instances of missing medications, fewer employee injuries, better hand hygiene and an overall improved patient experience as measured by HCAHPS.

The ASHRM Patient Safety Award recognized our organizational excellence in patient safety and celebrated our efforts in risk management and in promoting patient safety across our health care system. Receiving this recognition from an external authority, like ASHRM, is a confirmation of the work we're doing to move us towards our quadruple aim.

This award was the result of the hard work and dedication of the entire GBMC family. I am so grateful that the crew was here to document LDM so it can be shared during this year’s ASHRM annual meeting next month in Seattle. We will also receive a video that we can use to teach new employees about our process.

We should all be very proud of our achievements in moving closer towards our vision.